Ms. Lane, Math, Kindergarten

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Math Week of February 20th

We will finish up Chapter 10 in our math curriculum this week!


Use the activities below to help your student practice and use numbers through 100.

  • Have your student count by ones to 30 on a yardstick or tape measure, and to 50 or 100 on a tape measure or by reading page numbers in a book.
  • Count by ones as high as you can by taking turns saying the number that comes next. For example, you say, "one." Your student says, "two." You say, "three." Your student says "four," and so on. Vary the game by counting by tens ("ten," "twenty," "thirty," . . .).

Math Week of February 12th

We will continue to work on chapter 10 in our math curriculum and count to 100! 


Use the activities below to help your student practice and use numbers through 100.

  • Have your student count by ones to 30 on a yardstick or tape measure, and to 50 or 100 on a tape measure or by reading page numbers in a book.
  • Count by ones as high as you can by taking turns saying the number that comes next. For example, you say, "one." Your student says, "two." You say, "three." Your student says "four," and so on. Vary the game by counting by tens ("ten," "twenty," "thirty," . . .).

Math Week of February 5th

On Wednesday, student’s will have their chapter 9 post test. We will introduce chapter 10 with students on Thursday. In chapter 10, students will be working towards counting to 100! First, we will begin by counting to 30, then to 50, and then to 100! We will also work towards counting by 5s and 10s, to make counting objects quicker. For example, if there are 43 objects, they can count 10, 20, 30, 40, 41, 42, to 43! 


Use the activities below to help your student practice and use numbers through 100. 


  • Have your student count by ones to 30 on a yardstick or tape measure, and to 50 or 100 on a tape measure or by reading page numbers in a book. 
  • Count by ones as high as you can by taking turns saying the number that comes next. For example, you say, "one." Your student says, "two." You say, "three." Your student says "four," and so on. Vary the game by counting by tens ("ten," "twenty," "thirty," . . .).

Math Week of January 22nd

We will be finishing our work with Chapter 8 in our curriculum this week. This chapter is all about counting, representing, and writing the numbers 11-19!


Have fun with the activities below to help your student practice and

understand numbers to nineteen.

  • Give your student up to 19 pennies or other small objects to count.
  • Have your student write the number, for example, 12. Then ask your student to verify that 12 is correct by grouping ten pennies together to see if there are 2 extra pennies, making 12.
  • Take turns. One player shows ten fingers and the other person shows up to nine fingers. The player holding up ten fingers names the total number of fingers showing.
  • Make a number book using a notebook or by attaching ten sheets of paper with staples or a paper clip. Help your student number the pages 11 through 19. On each page, have your student draw as many objects (or dots) as that page's number.
  • If you have access to magazines, invite your student to find pictures of objects that illustrate one or more of the numbers to 19.

Use these activities as often as you would like. You might start by focusing on

the numbers 11 and 12 and gradually work your way up to 19.

Math Week of November 27th

In chapter 5, your student began to learn about subtraction concepts by taking apart a number. For example, your student might take apart 6 into 4 and 2. In this chapter, your student will use a subtraction sentence, which includes a minus sign, to show this relationship. Your student will subtract numbers within 10 to take away from a group of objects or animals and find how many are left. Your student will also subtract to take apart a whole and find the part that remains. Your student will discover subtraction patterns: When subtracting 0 from a number, the answer is the number. When subtracting 1 from a number, the answer is the counting number before the number. Finally, when subtracting a number from itself, the answer is 0. Your student will learn about the relationship between addition and subtraction by studying related facts, such as 2 + 3 = 5 and 5 − 3 = 2. This will help your student determine whether addition or subtraction best represents a situation. The vocabulary words for the chapter are left, minus sign, separate, subtract, subtraction sentence, and take away. Use the activities below to practice and apply subtraction with your student. 

  • Look for opportunities to talk about subtraction with your student. For example, perhaps you bought six bananas and now there are two. How many bananas did your family eat? There were ten people in line in front of you. Now there are four people in front of you. How many people left? 
  • Take turns subtracting 1. One person names a number up to ten, the other person says the number that is one less. 
  • Help your student practice writing subtraction sentences. Toss five coins on a table. Ask your student to write a sentence that uses the whole (all pennies) minus one part (heads) to find the other part (tails). 
  • Scatter up to ten pennies on a table. Have your student count the pennies and write the number.

Ask your student to look away while you cover some of the pennies with your hand or a sheet of paper. Challenge your student to name the number of hidden pennies using the number for the whole and the number of pennies that are showing.

Math Week of November 13th

Last week, students were introduced to Gus the Plus! This week in math, we will continue to explore what it means to add and create addition sentences. We will do this by joining groups together and uncover the missing addend by coloring objects and using ten frames. Please help students with this skill by asking them questions that join two groups together. For example: If Blanche had 2 treats today, how many more does she need to have 5? (PS: Blanche is our therapy dog at Westgate!)

Math Week of November 6th

In the previous chapter, your student learned that two parts make a whole. In this chapter, your student uses an addition equation, called addition sentence, including a plus sign and an equal sign, to show two parts and a whole. 

Your student learns two different ways to apply addition. One way involves groups of people or animals actively joining. For example, 2 students may join 3 students to play a game so there are 5 students playing in all. Another way involves non-moving objects, such as counters, to focus on parts and a whole. 

Your student discovers patterns: When adding 0 to a number, the answer is the number. When adding 1 to a number, the answer is the next counting number. Finally, your student finds a missing partner number (addend) by adding or counting on to the given partner number. For example, for 5 + ? = 9, your student might use counters to figure out that 5 and 4 more equals 9. The goal of the chapter is to build an understanding of addition, not to memorize facts, so don’t worry if your student needs to count objects to find answers. Here are some activities you can use to practice with your student. 

  • If you have two number cubes, change the sixes to zeros by covering the sixes with masking tape. Invite your student to toss the two cubes to make partner numbers. Encourage your student to name the partner numbers and the total, or the number in all. Expand the activity to include writing an addition sentence to show the parts and the whole. 
  • Play “Get to Ten” using fingers to find missing partner numbers. One player holds up any number of fingers. The other player names the number of fingers and how many more fingers are needed to get to ten. For example, if a player holds up 7 fingers, the other player might say, “Seven fingers; it takes three more to get to ten.” 
  • Make two sets of cards, numbered 1 through 5. Mix up the cards and spread them facedown on a table. Players take turns flipping over two cards to find partner numbers that make 6, for example, 2 and 4. If a player finds partners, the player gets to keep the cards. If not, the player turns the cards facedown. The player with the most cards wins! 

Math Week of October 30th

This will be our last week of Chapter 5. We are creating numbers 8, 9, 10 by forming number bonds. We have been practicing this skill with numbers 5, 6, and 7. In addition to this, we will also be decomposing a group of five. Students will be learning that decomposing a number is to break a number apart. 

Math Week of October 23rd

In this chapter, In this chapter, your student will put together two small groups of objects (parts) to form a larger group (the whole). They will also take apart a whole group to form two parts. They will use a number bond to show the numbers of objects in the parts and in the whole. 


Learning how two parts make a whole is the first step in learning to add and subtract. The vocabulary words for this chapter are put together, take apart, part, whole, partner numbers, and number bond. Use the activities below to help your student practice putting together parts to make a whole and taking apart a whole to make parts. 


  • Drop up to ten pennies on a table. Have your student name the number of heads, the number of tails, and the number of all pennies. 
  • Make a line on a tabletop with chalk or tape. Invite your student to drop up to ten dried beans or other small objects on the table. Ask your student to write the numbers of beans that fell on each side of the line and the number of beans in all. 
  • On the count of three, you and your student each show up to five fingers. Have your student name the number of fingers each person is showing and the number of fingers in all. 

Math Week of October 16th

In this chapter, your student compares numbers up to 10 as equal to, greater than, or less than each other. Your student also learns to classify objects into categories. You can use the activities below to practice and review number comparisons, sorting and classifying, and data collection. 


  • Place up to ten pennies on a table. Ask your student to place an equal number of pennies on the table. After you have played for a while, vary the game so that your student sets out a number of pennies that is greater than or less than the number of pennies you place on the table.
  • Help your student make a chart to tally and compare the number of cans of vegetables that are peas and the number of cans of vegetables that are not peas.

Math Week of September 25th

This week we will be comparing numbers up to 10 as greater than, less than, or equal to. Students will be learning how to classify objects into categories. They will be sorting, comparing, and classifying this week. Below are some ideas on how you can practice this at home. 

  • Use scraps of paper to make two sets of number cards from 0 to 10. Mix up the cards and place them face down on a table. Each player takes a number card and turns it faceup. Players compare the numbers. The player who has the greater number takes the faceup cards. Play continues until there are no cards left in the pile. The player with more (or the most) number cards wins.
  • Invite your student to help you sort the laundry. Have your student describe the sorting rule, such as light and dark items or clothing and towels. Have your student count the number of items in each group.

Math Week of September 25th

This week we will be comparing numbers up to 10 as greater than, less than, or equal to. Students will be learning how to classify objects into categories. They will be sorting, comparing, and classifying this week. Below are some ideas on how you can practice this at home. 

  • Use scraps of paper to make two sets of number cards from 0 to 10. Mix up the cards and place them face down on a table. Each player takes a number card and turns it faceup. Players compare the numbers. The player who has the greater number takes the faceup cards. Play continues until there are no cards left in the pile. The player with more (or the most) number cards wins.
  • Invite your student to help you sort the laundry. Have your student describe the sorting rule, such as light and dark items or clothing and towels. Have your student count the number of items in each group.

Week of Sept. 11 (Math)

Dear Family,
In this chapter, your student learns about the numbers 6 through 10. Your
student will count a number of objects, then color the same number of boxes in
a ten frame.
 ten frame
After learning about each quantity, your student will learn to write the
numeral.
At the end of the chapter, your student writes the numbers in order both
forward and backward.
This chapter's vocabulary includes exposure to the written number words six,
seven, eight, nine, and ten. Your student uses the words in conversation but is
not expected to write the words.
Here are a few activities you can use with your student to practice numbers to
ten.
• Make a ten frame by cutting the last two egg cups off an empty egg
carton. Have your student count up to ten small objects (such as beans,
coins, or buttons) as they drop each object into a cup of the ten-frame
carton. Change the activity by starting with up to ten objects in cups of
the ten-frame carton. Have your student name and write the number of
objects.
• Play a game using fingers on both hands to count and to name numbers.
Take turns. One player holds up six or more fingers, and the other
player names the number.
• Make a poster together showing objects that are commonly found in
groups of six, seven, eight, nine, or ten, such as six juice boxes in a
package, seven days in a week, eight legs on a spider, nine squares in
tic-tac-toe, and ten pins in bowling.
• Show your student page numbers in a book. Have your student count up
to page 10 and back to page 1 by flipping pages. 

Week of Sept. 4th

Dear Family,
In this chapter, your student will learn to compare numbers from 0 to 5. At
first, they will draw lines, matching objects in one group with objects in a
second group to see if any are left over. Then they will count the numbers of
objects in two groups to compare the numbers. Finally, they will simply compare
two numbers.
Throughout the chapter, your student will circle a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down
to show whether two groups or numbers are equal. They will circle a group or
number to show that it is greater than another, and they will draw a line
through a group or number to show that it is less than another.
Your student will learn more about comparing numbers in Chapters 4 and 9. You
can use the following activities to practice and review comparing numbers
throughout the year.
 Look for opportunities to talk about one-to-one correspondences in
your home. For example: How many mittens do you need for two hands?
How many dinner plates do you need for four family members?
 When setting the table, have your student count a group of forks, and
then a group of spoons. Ask your student whether the groups are equal
in number. If not, ask which group has a greater (or lesser) number of
objects.
 Play a finger game to compare numbers. Hold up two to four fingers.
Have your student name the number of fingers. Then ask your student
to hold up an equal number of fingers, a greater number of fingers, or a
lesser number of fingers.
 Use masking tape to change the sixes to zeros on two number cubes.
Take turns tossing the number cubes and comparing the numbers.
 Place a number of small objects, such as paperclips or beans in each of
your hands.  Invite your student to guess which hand has more. Have
your student verify the guess by counting the objects and comparing
the numbers.

Week of August 28

Hello Families, 
In math this week we will start Chapter 2 in our Big Ideas math curriculum. Chapter 2 explores quantities and we will compare groups. We will use the terms greater than, less than, and equal to.