Mrs. Hamilton, Math, 1st Grade

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Hamilton's Math Update 4/22/24

In this chapter, your student is learning to tell time to the hour and half hour. We will start using only hour hands on an analog clock, then we will use the minute hand. Later, we will use digital clocks. The vocabulary words for this chapter are: analog clock, hour hand, hour, o’clock, half hour, half past, minute hand, minute, and digital clock.

Here are a few situations that you can use to practice telling time.  

  • Guide your student to number a paper plate to look like the face of a clock. Start with 12 and 6, then label 9 and 3, and finally fill in the numbers between. Cut out hour and minute hands from paper and attach them to the clock using a metal brad or paper clip. Ask your student to show a given time on the clock. For example, say, “You have a piano lesson at 4 o’clock. Show the time on your clock.” Ask your student to explain how to set the clock. If your student confuses the hands, point out that “minute” is a longer word than “hour,” and relate this to the fact that the minute hand is longer than the hour hand.
  • When getting ready for school, have your student watch the clock for given times. For example, say, “We need to eat breakfast at 7 o’clock. What will the clock look like at that time?” Then have your student tell you when the clock shows the given time. Repeat with other times, such as the time your student needs to leave the house.
  • Throughout the day, ask your student to look at the clock and tell the time, then explain how he or she knows the time (to the hour and half hour only). If reading an analog clock, have your student tell what the time would look like on a digital clock, and vice versa.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for clocks and tell the time.

Have a great time practicing telling time together!

Hamilton's Math Update 4-15-24

We will start unit 11, Data and Probability. 

 

In this chapter, your student is learning to show and interpret data using tally charts, bar graphs, and picture graphs. Your student will use these types of displays to solve problems involving data. The vocabulary words for this chapter are: data, tally chart, tally mark, picture graph, and bar graph.

Here are a few activities that you can use in the kitchen with your student to practice the skills of this chapter.

  • When putting groceries away, have your student practice using tally marks. For example, say, “There are six juice boxes in this package. How do you use tally marks to represent six?” Have your student describe the tally marks or write them on paper.
  • When packing lunches or preparing dinner or a snack, have your student count how many items there are of different types. For example, ask, “What types of fruit are in the fruit bowl? How many do we have of each item?” Then, have your student make a tally chart or bar graph to display the number of oranges, apples, and bananas. Ask questions such as, “How many more apples than bananas are there? How many pieces of fruit do we have in all?”
  • Have your student post a blank tally chart in the kitchen and ask each family member to record how many servings of fruits and vegetables they eat throughout the day. At the end of the day, have your student use the data to make a picture graph. Ask, “Who ate the most fruits and vegetables? How many fruits and vegetables did our family eat in all?” Encourage your student to think of questions to ask you about the data as well.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to represent and interpret data.

Have a great time practicing tally charts and graphs together!

Hamilton's Math Update 4-8-24

We will start unit 11, Data and Probability. 

In this chapter, your student is learning to show and interpret data using tally charts, bar graphs, and picture graphs. Your student will use these types of displays to solve problems involving data. The vocabulary words for this chapter are: data, tally chart, tally mark, picture graph, and bar graph.

Here are a few activities that can be used in the kitchen with your student to practice the skills of this chapter.

  • When putting groceries away, have your student practice using tally marks. For example, say, “There are six juice boxes in this package. How do you use tally marks to represent six?” Have your student describe the tally marks or write them on paper.
  • When packing lunches or preparing dinner or a snack, have your student count how many items there are of different types. For example, ask, “What types of fruit are in the fruit bowl? How many do we have of each item?” Then, have your student make a tally chart or bar graph to display the number of oranges, apples, and bananas. Ask questions such as, “How many more apples than bananas are there? How many pieces of fruit do we have in all?”
  • Have your student post a blank tally chart in the kitchen and ask each family member to record how many servings of fruits and vegetables they eat throughout the day. At the end of the day, have your student use the data to make a picture graph. Ask, “Who ate the most fruits and vegetables? How many fruits and vegetables did our family eat in all?” Encourage your student to think of questions to ask you about the data as well.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to represent and interpret data.

Have a great time practicing tally charts and graphs together!

Hamilton's Math Update 3-18-24

We will continue Chapter 10, measurement while reviewing 2-digit addition. 

In this chapter, your student is learning to compare and measure the lengths of objects. The lessons address ordering objects by length, comparing the lengths of two objects using a third object, using like objects to measure length, and solving word problems that compare lengths.

The vocabulary words for this chapter are shortest, longest, length, measure, length unit, and inch.

There are many situations where you can practice measuring and comparing lengths. Look for opportunities to reinforce these skills while playing with your student! As you and your student spend time together, use his or her toys, games, and art supplies to practice math skills. Use the following strategies to involve your student: • When playing a game, have your student compare the lengths of the objects involved. For example, ask, “Is the game card or the spinner longer? Is the board longer or shorter than the game money?” • When drawing or coloring, select three objects, such as three crayons, or a marker, a paintbrush, and a colored pencil. Ask your student to order the items from longest to shortest or shortest to longest. Ask your student to explain how he or she determined how to order the objects. • While playing with toys, choose three items. Compare two of the items to a third, then have your student compare the first two. For example, say, “The toy drum is shorter than the flute. The xylophone is longer than the flute. Is the toy drum longer or shorter than the xylophone?” • Use a small item, such as a toy car, number cube, or playing card, to measure the length of other toys. First, have your student estimate the length of the toy in terms of the smaller item. Then, have him or her measure to find the length. For example, ask, “About how many cards long do you think the teddy bear is?” Then, line up cards side by side beside the bear without gaps or overlaps. Count to find how many cards in length the bear is. By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to compare and measure lengths, such as measuring clothing items, snack items, or plant leaves. Have a great time practicing measurement!

Hamilton's Math Update 3-11-24

We will be starting Chapter 10 while reviewing 2-digit addition. 

 

In this chapter, your student is learning to compare and measure lengths of objects. The lessons address ordering objects by length, comparing the lengths of two objects using a third object, using like objects to measure length, and solving word problems that compare lengths.

The vocabulary words for this chapter are: shortest, longest, length, measure, length unit, and inch. 

There are many situations where you can practice measuring and comparing lengths. Look for opportunities to reinforce these skills while playing with your student! As you and your student spend time together, use his or her toys, games, and art supplies to practice math skills.

Use the following strategies to involve your student:

• When playing a game, have your student compare the lengths of the objects involved. For example, ask, “Is the game card or the spinner longer? Is the board longer or shorter than the game money?”

• When drawing or coloring, select three objects, such as three crayons, or a marker, a paintbrush, and a colored pencil. Ask your student to order the items from longest to shortest or shortest to longest. Ask your student to explain how he or she determined how to order the objects.

• While playing with toys, choose three items. Compare two of the items to a third, then have your student compare the first two. For example, say, “The toy drum is shorter than the flute. The xylophone is longer than the flute. Is the toy drum longer or shorter than the xylophone?”

• Use a small item, such as a toy car, number cube, or playing card, to measure the length of other toys. First, have your student estimate the length of the toy in terms of the smaller item. Then, have him or her measure to find the length. For example, ask, “About how many cards long do you think the teddy bear is?” Then, line up cards side by side beside the bear without gaps or overlaps. Count to find how many cards in length the bear is. By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to compare and measure lengths, such as measuring clothing items, snack items, or plant leaves. Have a great time practicing measurement!

 

Hamilton's Math Update 3-4-24

We will wrap up chapter 9 this week.  In this chapter, your student is learning various strategies for adding two-digit numbers. The lessons address adding tens and adding ones, using a number line to add, and making a 10 to add. There are no new vocabulary words introduced in this chapter.

There are many situations that you can use to model adding two numbers. Pointing out real-world situations that use addition is a great way to help students connect math with real life! This will help reinforce the importance of addition, and answer the question, “When will I ever use this?” The maximum sum in this chapter is 99. This aligns well with many daily activities.

Use the following strategies to practice with your student:

  • To model adding tens and ones, point out the number of items needed for an activity. For example, point out that you will buy a package of 25 plates and a package of 36 cups for a birthday party. Then ask, “How many ones are there? Are there enough ones to make a 10? How many tens are there? How many plates and cups are there in all?” Encourage your student to make a quick sketch of the tens and ones if needed.
  • To practice adding tens and ones on a number line, point out the day’s low and high temperatures. Say, “It is 57 degrees now. Later, it will be 74 degrees. How many degrees will the temperature increase?” Or say, “It is 57 degrees now. The temperature will increase 17 degrees this afternoon. What will the temperature be then?” Ask your student to explain how to use a number line to find the answer.
  • To practice using addition strategies to solve problems, point out how many miles you will drive for an event. Say, “We will drive 18 miles to Grandma’s house, then 24 more miles to the zoo. We have enough gas in the car to drive 50 miles. Do we have enough gas, or do we need to stop for more along the way?” Have your student explain how to find the answer.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to use addition, such as finding the total number of minutes needed to get ready and travel to school each day.

Have a great time practicing addition!

Hamilton's Math Update 2-26-24

We have started chapter 9.  In this chapter, your student is learning various strategies for adding two-digit numbers. The lessons address adding tens and adding ones, using a number line to add, and making a 10 to add. There are no new vocabulary words introduced in this chapter.

There are many situations that you can use to model adding two numbers. Pointing out real-world situations that use addition is a great way to help students connect math with real life! This will help reinforce the importance of addition, and answer the question, “When will I ever use this?” The maximum sum in this chapter is 99. This aligns well with many daily activities.

Use the following strategies to practice with your student:

  • To model adding tens and ones, point out the number of items needed for an activity. For example, point out that you will buy a package of 25 plates and a package of 36 cups for a birthday party. Then ask, “How many ones are there? Are there enough ones to make a 10? How many tens are there? How many plates and cups are there in all?” Encourage your student to make a quick sketch of the tens and ones if needed.
  • To practice adding tens and ones on a number line, point out the day’s low and high temperatures. Say, “It is 57 degrees now. Later, it will be 74 degrees. How many degrees will the temperature increase?” Or say, “It is 57 degrees now. The temperature will increase 17 degrees this afternoon. What will the temperature be then?” Ask your student to explain how to use a number line to find the answer.
  • To practice using addition strategies to solve problems, point out how many miles you will drive for an event. Say, “We will drive 18 miles to Grandma’s house, then 24 more miles to the zoo. We have enough gas in the car to drive 50 miles. Do we have enough gas, or do we need to stop for more along the way?” Have your student explain how to find the answer.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to use addition, such as finding the total number of minutes needed to get ready and travel to school each day.

Have a great time practicing addition!

Hamilton's Math Update 2-19-24

Math: We will take our chapter 8 posttest on Tuesday and start chapter 9.  In this chapter, your student is learning various strategies for adding two-digit numbers. The lessons address adding tens and adding ones, using a number line to add, and making a 10 to add. There are no new vocabulary words introduced in this chapter.

There are many situations that you can use to model adding two numbers. Pointing out real-world situations that use addition is a great way to help students connect math with real life! This will help reinforce the importance of addition, and answer the question, “When will I ever use this?” The maximum sum in this chapter is 99. This aligns well with many daily activities.

Use the following strategies to practice with your student:

  • To model adding tens and ones, point out the number of items needed for an activity. For example, point out that you will buy a package of 25 plates and a package of 36 cups for a birthday party. Then ask, “How many ones are there? Are there enough ones to make a 10? How many tens are there? How many plates and cups are there in all?” Encourage your student to make a quick sketch of the tens and ones if needed.
  • To practice adding tens and ones on a number line, point out the day’s low and high temperatures. Say, “It is 57 degrees now. Later, it will be 74 degrees. How many degrees will the temperature increase?” Or say, “It is 57 degrees now. The temperature will increase 17 degrees this afternoon. What will the temperature be then?” Ask your student to explain how to use a number line to find the answer.
  • To practice using addition strategies to solve problems, point out how many miles you will drive for an event. Say, “We will drive 18 miles to Grandma’s house, then 24 more miles to the zoo. We have enough gas in the car to drive 50 miles. Do we have enough gas, or do we need to stop for more along the way?” Have your student explain how to find the answer.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to look for other opportunities to use addition, such as finding the total number of minutes needed to get ready and travel to school each day.

Have a great time practicing addition!

Hamilton's Math Update 2-12-24

We will be finishing up Chapter 8 this week.  In this chapter, your student is learning to add and subtract tens. Students will begin by finding 10 more or 10 less than a number. They will then add and subtract tens using various strategies including number lines, quick sketches, and using addition to subtract. The vocabulary phrase associated with this chapter is open number line.

We played some math games on Friday.  Ask your student to show you how to play poison and top it.  These are great games to help build mental math awareness.

To practice adding and subtracting tens with your student, use everyday items found in packages that contain multiple items, such as straws, paper clips, or toothpicks.

When you notice such a package, either at home or while shopping, ask questions like these.

  • To practice using mental math to find 10 more or 10 less, have your student find the number of items in the package. Then ask, “How many crayons are in that box? What is 10 more than that number? What is 10 less than that number?”
  • Show your student the number of items, then say that you need a certain multiple of 10 more (20, 30, 40, etc.), not exceeding a total of 100. For example, point out that there are 12 eggs in a carton. Ask, “How many eggs would there be if I bought 50 more?” Encourage your student to explain the strategy used to find the total. Repeat, using subtraction. Say, “There are 75 beads in this package. If we use 30 for a project, how many will be left? What if we use 60?”
  • To reinforce the connection between addition and subtraction, ask your student what addition equation can be used to solve a subtraction problem. Ask, “There are 60 party cups in this package. We need 20 for tomorrow’s picnic. What addition equation can you use to find how many cups will be left?”
  • Model other scenarios and have your student discuss how to use an open number line, quick sketch, or mental math to find the sum or difference.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to think of other opportunities to practice adding and subtracting tens.

Have a great time adding and subtracting tens!

Hamilton's Math Update 2-5-24

We will be starting Chapter 8 this week.  In this chapter, your student is learning to add and subtract tens. Students will begin by finding 10 more or 10 less than a number. They will then add and subtract tens using various strategies including number lines, quick sketches, and using addition to subtract. The vocabulary phrase associated with this chapter is an open number line.

To practice adding and subtracting tens with your student, use everyday items found in packages that contain multiple items, such as straws, paper clips, or toothpicks.

When you notice such a package, either at home or while shopping, ask questions like these.

  • To practice using mental math to find 10 more or 10 less, have your student find the number of items in the package. Then ask, “How many crayons are in that box? What is 10 more than that number? What is 10 less than that number?”
  • Show your student the number of items, then say that you need a certain multiple of 10 more (20, 30, 40, etc.), not exceeding a total of 100. For example, point out that there are 12 eggs in a carton. Ask, “How many eggs would there be if I bought 50 more?” Encourage your student to explain the strategy used to find the total. Repeat, using subtraction. Say, “There are 75 beads in this package. If we use 30 for a project, how many will be left? What if we use 60?”
  • To reinforce the connection between addition and subtraction, ask your student what addition equation can be used to solve a subtraction problem. Ask, “There are 60 party cups in this package. We need 20 for tomorrow’s picnic. What addition equation can you use to find how many cups will be left?”
  • Model other scenarios and have your student discuss how to use an open number line, quick sketch, or mental math to find the sum or difference.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to think of other opportunities to practice adding and subtracting tens.

Have a great time adding and subtracting tens!

Hamilton's Math Update 1-29-24

This week, we will wrap up Unit 7, comparing numbers within 100. We will use the phrases equal to, greater than, and less than. We will use the symbols =, >, and <. We will also find one more, one less, ten more, and ten less than a given number.

The vocabulary words associated with this chapter are: compare, greater than, and less than.

Sporting events and other games are a great place to practice comparing numbers. Your student is comparing two-digit numbers, so any two scores from 0 through 99 can be compared.

When playing or watching a game, use the following activities.

  • Have your student identify the score of the game. Ask your student which team or player has the most points. Then ask, “How can you tell?” Remind your student to compare the tens first, then compare the ones. Encourage him or her to use the phrases equal to, greater than, and less than to compare the number of points each team or player has. You also can use this strategy when playing board games or video games together at home.
  • Have your student choose a player and tell you the number on the player’s jersey. Ask, “What number is one more than that number? One less? Ten more? Ten less?” You also can use this strategy with the number of points a certain player or team has.
  • To compare numbers on a number line, state how many points you each have during a game. Ask, “Who has a greater number of points: you or me?” Then ask, “On a number line, is your number of points to the left or to the right of my number of points?”

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to think of other reasons to compare numbers, such as page numbers in books or distances listed on road signs.

Have a great time comparing numbers!

Hamilton's Math Update 1-22-24

This week, we will start Unit 7.  In this chapter, your student is comparing numbers within 100. We will use the phrases equal to, greater than, and less than. We will use the symbols =, >, and <. We will also find one more, one less, ten more, and ten less than a given number.

The vocabulary words associated with this chapter are: compare, greater than, and less than.

Sporting events and other games are a great place to practice comparing numbers. Your student is comparing two-digit numbers, so any two scores from 0 through 99 can be compared.

When playing or watching a game, use the following activities.

  • Have your student identify the score of the game. Ask your student which team or player has the most points. Then ask, “How can you tell?” Remind your student to compare the tens first, then compare the ones. Encourage him or her to use the phrases equal to, greater than, and less than to compare the number of points each team or player has. You also can use this strategy when playing board games or video games together at home.
  • Have your student choose a player and tell you the number on the player’s jersey. Ask, “What number is one more than that number? One less? Ten more? Ten less?” You also can use this strategy with the number of points a certain player or team has.
  • To compare numbers on a number line, state how many points you each have during a game. Ask, “Who has a greater number of points: you or me?” Then ask, “On a number line, is your number of points to the left or to the right of my number of points?”

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to think of other reasons to compare numbers, such as page numbers in books or distances listed on road signs.

Have a great time comparing numbers!

 

Hamilton's Math Update 1/15/24

This week, we will finish chapter 6 with our review on Tuesday and take our post test on Wed.  We will start Unit 7.  In this chapter, your student is comparing numbers within 100. We will use the phrases equal to, greater than, and less than. We will use the symbols =, >, and <. We will also find one more, one less, ten more, and ten less than a given number.

The vocabulary words associated with this chapter are: compare, greater than, and less than.

Sporting events and other games are a great place to practice comparing numbers. Your student is comparing two-digit numbers, so any two scores from 0 through 99 can be compared.

When playing or watching a game, use the following activities.

  • Have your student identify the score of the game. Ask your student which team or player has the most points. Then ask, “How can you tell?” Remind your student to compare the tens first, then compare the ones. Encourage him or her to use the phrases equal to, greater than, and less than to compare the number of points each team or player has. You also can use this strategy when playing board games or video games together at home.
  • Have your student choose a player and tell you the number on the player’s jersey. Ask, “What number is one more than that number? One less? Ten more? Ten less?” You also can use this strategy with the number of points a certain player or team has.
  • To compare numbers on a number line, state how many points you each have during a game. Ask, “Who has a greater number of points: you or me?” Then ask, “On a number line, is your number of points to the left or to the right of my number of points?”

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to think of other reasons to compare numbers, such as page numbers in books or distances listed on road signs.

Have a great time comparing numbers!

Hamilton's Math Update 1-7-24

Welcome back and Happy New Year! This week, we will continue in chapter 6 talking about decade numbers and diving deeper into place value. 

The vocabulary words associated with this chapter are 120 chart, row, column, decade numbers, digit, ones, tens, ones place, and tens place.

Here are a few strategies that you can use with your student to practice understanding the digits of numbers up to 120.

  • Encourage your student to look for numbers wherever you are. Then, review the value of the digits in the tens and ones places. For example, you might notice a speed limit sign, a channel number on TV, or the jersey number of a favorite athlete. Ask your student to name the number, then tell which digit is in the tens place and which is in the ones place. Then ask about the value of each digit. For example, “The 4 is in the tens place in 45. How much is 4 tens? How much is 5 ones?” You can also use these numbers to review counting on by ones or tens. Ask, “What are the next five numbers when you count on by ones? What are the next five numbers when you count on by tens?”
  • Hunt for decade numbers while running errands. See how many you and your student can find on signs, license plates, or price tags. Then have your student tell how many tens are in that number.
  • To practice identifying numbers with a given amount of tens and ones, make stacks of 10 pennies and leave up to 9 pennies unstacked. Model how to count the stacks by tens, then count the leftovers by ones. Have your student do the same, then tell how many pennies in all.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to point out and identify any numbers they see up to 120.

Have a great time practicing numbers together!

Hamilton's Math Update 12-11-23

This week, we will continue in chapter 6. In this chapter, your student is learning about place value and counting by ones and by tens to 120. Your student will learn what it means when a digit is in the tens place or the ones place, and will recognize how many tens and ones make up numbers up to 120.

The vocabulary words associated with this chapter are 120 chart, row, column, decade numbers, digit, ones, tens, one's place, and tens place.

Here are a few strategies that you can use with your student to practice understanding the digits of numbers up to 120.

  • Encourage your student to look for numbers wherever you are. Then, review the value of the digits in the tens and ones places. For example, you might notice a speed limit sign, a channel number on TV, or the jersey number of a favorite athlete. Ask your student to name the number, then tell which digit is in the tens place and which is in the ones place. Then ask about the value of each digit. For example, “The 4 is in the tens place in 45. How much is 4 tens? How much is 5 ones?” You can also use these numbers to review counting on by ones or tens. Ask, “What are the next five numbers when you count on by ones? What are the next five numbers when you count on by tens?”
  • Hunt for decade numbers while running errands. See how many you and your student can find on signs, license plates, or price tags. Then have your student tell how many tens are in that number.
  • To practice identifying numbers with a given amount of tens and ones, make stacks of 10 pennies and leave up to 9 pennies unstacked. Model how to count the stacks by tens, then count the leftovers by ones. Have your student do the same, then tell how many pennies in all.

By the end of this chapter, your student should feel confident with the learning targets and success criteria on the next page. Encourage your student to point out and identify any numbers they see up to 120.

Have a great time practicing numbers together!